Network Network Network

Before deciding to study publishing, speaking to people came naturally. I could approach a stranger at an event easily and spark a conversation because there was no ulterior motive for doing so, other than the sheer enjoyment of human interaction. Now, however, I do have an agenda: I want to be noticed. I want to be remembered. I want to make an impression so that someone, somewhere will one day think I’ll be an asset to their company.

When I began Napier’s course, I was encouraged to attend as many events as possible and to grab every opportunity by the horns. This had never been an issue for me before because I either decided to go to an event or I decided to stay at home. If I wasn’t feeling up to it, or had a rare day of feeling shy, I felt no guilt in curling up in my jammies and spending the evening binge watching Netflix instead. But now, I can’t afford to stay at home and miss out on meeting all the important people. The guilt is real. I know that if I don’t go, I’m only disadvantaging myself and my future career. That being said, whilst I do want to emphasise the importance of getting out there and interacting with people in the industry, because hey, they’re bloomin’ incredible folk, I have discovered an absolute saviour in the networking business: Twitter.

Twitter is definitely something I stayed away from pre-publishing degree. I didn’t understand how to use it properly, and again, I had no real agenda. Connecting with friends was far easier via other social media platforms, such as Facebook and Snapchat. But upon venturing into the publishing industry, Twitter has become my holy grail for when I need to network but am not particularly feeling up to it. I cannot stress the value of this incredibly, sometimes dauntingly, fast-paced-updated-by-the-second environment. There is no better way to stay in the loop and up-to-date with the publishing industry. I can refresh my feed every minute and someone will have a new opinion, there will be a new article to read or a new connection suggested. Even better, I can do it all in my pyjamas with Netflix on in the background.

One of the many major benefits of Twitter is the ability to participate in live conversations. The SYP are extremely well versed in this, and often host live chat Q&A evenings. These typically last an hour and allow people from all over the world to engage with people in the industry. You can voice your fears and receive comfort, share your experiences, teach others valuable lessons and learn anything and everything in the space of an hour. Above all, you can make those all important connections, whilst simultaneously cooking dinner.

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Various events I’ve attended have shown me that having a strong Twitter identity really pays off when meeting people face to face. If you’re active in the community and your profile is recognisable and memorable, then chances are someone will remember that conversation they had with you, where you helped them overcome a fear, or gave them advice they later followed.

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Finally, I suggest really getting to know how Twitter works. Use ALL the hashtags, even base your tweets around being able to hashtag as much as possible and include the publisher in your tweets when talking about a book.

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Show that you have an interest in the industry and that you appreciate someone’s work. The engagement these tweets can generate is unreal, and allows people in the industry to see that you’re an active member of their community.

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If you’re new to Twitter like I was, build an identity that you’d be happy to show a potential employer. Be someone that your mum would be proud of and that someone in the industry would want to meet. It’s also great when someone’s accusing you of not being productive because you’re on your phone, (I’m looking at you, boyfriend) and you can tell them they’re wrong: you’re networking.

Featured in this post:

@SYPScotland 

@SYP_UK

@KT_CHAR_ELL

My Twitter: @kiiimberellla

 

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Advice on your new publishing world!

I applied for MSc Publishing at Edinburgh Napier University pretty late on last year. I had graduated with an Honours in English Literature and was a bit stuck on what to do. This course was suggested to me by a careers advisor. I applied after doing a bit of my own research, and was accepted to the course to start in September 2016. Initially, it was daunting, as any would any masters course would be, and in the run up to my start date I began looking online for some more information about what I would be doing.

It’s hard to go through blog posts and material that may not be relevant by the time you start, so here’s a list of what I believe to be important and that won’t change in the near future. Hopefully this will give you a bit of help if you are about to embark on what’s, no doubt, going to be one of the quickest years of your life. Continue reading “Advice on your new publishing world!”

Can You Be a Parent and a Publishing Student?

Publishing blog
That’s lovely, darling. But wouldn’t you rather read a book?

When I applied to do MSc Publishing in June 2016, I had worked in various forms of publishing as a journalist, copywriter and editor, so deciding to study it seemed like the logical next step in my career. However, unlike the average student, I had been out of higher education for seven years and I also had a daughter (the spirited creature here) who had just turned two.

Now that I’m at the end of the second trimester of the course, I have some advice for any parents thinking of making a return to higher education, because I know from when I was researching courses that a lot of the information I read was tailored towards students who didn’t have any dependents.

I was not the first parent to go to university, and I will not be the last. I hope this blog post helps someone thinking of returning to university after a long break, or someone who is thinking of applying for a course for the very first time. Continue reading “Can You Be a Parent and a Publishing Student?”

Bookie Updates: Ah Dinnae Ken and Crowdfunding

Following our decision to join the Let Books be Books  for our childrens project,  The Day Boy and The Night Girl  we also wanted to update you further on our YA project Ah Dinnae Ken.

Now things have also been progressing rapidly for our other project, Ah Dinnae KenRight now we are halfway through our crowdfunding campaign to support the print and distribution of Ah Dinnae Ken.

And we wanted to take this time to share our message and our belief in this project in the hope that you would be interested in supporting and becoming involved in our project.

So here is a little summary about who we are and why we are doing this. And a little sneak peek at the supporters we’ve gotten so far!

Sponsume Link: http://www.sponsume.com/project/ah-dinnae-ken-stories-scottish-identity

Details:

Hello there! We are a team postgraduate publishing students at Edinburgh Napier University who are currently working on a live book project for Merchiston Publishing, in-house publishing arm of Edinburgh Napier University and the Scottish Centre for the Book. Merchiston Publishing is a not-for-profit publishing house which distributes copies of its books freely, and is supported by the generous donations of organizations such as the Edward Clark Trust.  See more at: http://www.sponsume.com/project/ah-dinnae-ken-stories-scottish-identity#sthash.KPdFi4VS.dpuf

What does it mean to be Scottish? Can Scottishness be defined, and is there really a difference between Scotland and the rest of the UK? Some of today’s leading Scottish authors for young adult literature – Cathy MacPhail, Claire McFall, Cathy Forde, Diana Hendry, J.A. Henderson, and others – address these questions and more, in this thought-provoking collection of stories about national identity. Each story is unique, some are amusing, others moving, but together they show how different people, ideas, and even dialects make up the Scotland we know and love today. The book also features a foreword by Scottish journalist and broadcaster, Stuart Cosgrove. See more at: http://www.sponsume.com/project/ah-dinnae-ken-stories-scottish-identity#sthash.KPdFi4VS.dpuf

 

We really believe in this project and we want to copies of the book to as many schools as we possibly can. So please take a minute to check out our link and watch our little video featuring Kenny the Book who just wants to be shared in schools.

Thank you x