My Placement at Entangled Publishing

Since day one of the Publishing course at Napier, it was mentioned that Twitter is a great tool to connect with others in the industry and keep an eye out for possible internship/job opportunities. Funny enough, it was through this very platform that my internship with Entangled started.

Entangled Publishing is an independent publisher of romantic fiction, in the adult and young adult markets. They’ve released more than 1,200 titles, including the YA novel Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout which was signed for a major motion picture. They have 13 imprints which range from a variety of ages and topics and the novels are released in digital and printed form. Approximately 20 to 35 titles are published in digital form and 4 in print and e formats simultaneously each month. Furthermore, 57 of their books have made it to the USA Today Bestsellers list and 17 to the New York Bestsellers list.

The position being advertised was for readers to help with submissions. As well as reading a bunch of manuscripts, which sold it for me already, they were offering to give editorial workshops. Along with production, one of my areas of interest within publishing is editorial, so this was just what I needed.

As a reader, you are tasked with reading the manuscripts assigned to you and fill out a report regarding key editorial aspects and your reading experience. Afterward, you must decide whether they should take it on or decline it. During my first reports, I was very hesitant to straight out say no. But after a couple more reports, I started to get a sense of what works and what doesn’t for the publisher.

You have to get into a state of mind that is a bit more critical and aware, without forgetting to enjoy the read. No two stories are the same. Each author draws inspiration from different places, creates characters with various backgrounds, and arranges the plot in distinct manners.

As mentioned before, I was really looking forward to the editorial workshops and they have been beyond amazing. I’ve learned about the numerous aspects that make a good story and the work that goes into each of them.

Overall, my experience as an editorial intern for Entangled has been an incredible learning experience and I’m really looking forward to the upcoming submissions and workshops.

-Damarys S. Campos

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Edinburgh: The Secret Ingredient

Back in 2004, Edinburgh was the first city to receive the title of “City of Literature” by UNESCO for its literary heritage that spans over many centuries and current efforts in this regard. And it shows. Edinburgh is known for its famous authors, book festivals, publishing scene, unique bookshops, libraries and museums, literary prizes, so much more. There is always something taking place in this city and events to look forward to.

In the few months I’ve been in Edinburgh, these are some of the events that took place.

#BookshopDay is a campaign first launched in 2016 by Books are My Bag. This year it took place on October 7 and more than 2,000 bookshops throughout the UK and Ireland were involved. The public had the chance to win book tokens and purchase a limited edition totes in two different designs –– one for adults and another for kids. You better believe I got my hands on one.

Later on, I had the amazing opportunity of attending the Saltire Society Literary Awards Shortlist announcement at Waterstones in Princes Street. These awards celebrated Scottish literature and the publishers behind them. During this event, the nominees for the various categories were unveiled, a small excerpt was read for a few of the books, and wine was shared.

A very pleasant surprise was finding out about SYP (Society of Young Publishers) Scotland. This is an organization that works throughout the UK to support new publishers entering the industry. They’ve organized gatherings such as the socials where students and professionals alike have the opportunity to chat and network. Other events were the 6×6 with PublishEd, Inclusivity in Children’s Publishing, and the Christmas Party where guests speakers would share their experiences and current work in the publishing industry.

This Is It! Literary Cabaret took the attendees on a 90-minutes run-through of the literary highlights of 2017 regarding publishing, festivals, libraries, writer, and more. Some of the speakers included award-winning poet William Letford, Francis Bickmore form Canongate Book, and best-selling author Louise Welsh.

On a bigger scale and for extended dates, we had the Edinburgh Book Festival, “the largest public celebration of the written word in the world” according to their website. More than 1,000 writers and thinkers gather for this festival. Then there was the Radical Book Fair which is Edinburgh’s alternative, independent, and entirely bookshop run flee market of books and ideas. It included over 80 stalls and various guest speakers. Book Week Scotland ran on an even bigger scale having activities and lectures in different cities in Scotland.

Furthermore, there are book launches and author signing events taking place frequently at various bookshops. And if you want to mix literature and history, a number of literary tours are available in Edinburgh that will take you around town to places of literary significance or you could visit the coffee shop where JK Rowling wrote part of Harry Potter. (That’s The Elephant House in case you’re interested.)

Coming from a country that’s a clear contrast, it’s been a welcomed surprise moving to a city that avidly celebrates and shares its love for literature. It has reaffirmed my decision to go forward with my publishing masters and nurtured my love for books. In the recipe for publishing, Edinburgh definitely is the secret ingredient that makes it all even better.

 

-Damarys S. Campos